ART FOR EVERYONE

Let’s be honest… almost everyone loves art.  We may not always like the same art and we may not always understand art, but we all have a love and appreciation for some form of art.  Art however seems to be an incredibly intimidating subject – art moves so fast, there is always one hot artist, a movement or a new form of lingo used to describe it… but to be honest – art is, and always has been, for everyone. From our initial reaction to an artwork, to the critical acclaim a work may or may not get – it is always about how an audience reacts to and interacts with a piece of work.

 
teatime
“Teatime Summer” by Ali McNabney-Stevens
 

Let’s be honest… almost everyone loves art.  We may not always like the same art and we may not always understand art, but we all have a love and appreciation for some form of art.  Art however seems to be an incredibly intimidating subject – art moves so fast, there is always one hot artist, a movement or a new form of lingo used to describe it… but to be honest – art is, and always has been, for everyone. From our initial reaction to an artwork, to the critical acclaim a work may or may not get – it is always about how an audience reacts to and interacts with a piece of work.

 
TIPPLE-OFFICE
“Grim” Framed Photographic Work by Mark Tipple
 

Below are some of our tips on how to buy and curate your own collection of art: 

Buy with your gut: Don’t look art the artists name, title or price until you already love the work, even if you’re shopping for an investment. If you don’t love the piece – you might as well leave your money in the bank or keep the artwork wrapped up in your basement. This artwork will hang proudly in your home or office and if it brings you no joy it is a waste.

Buy the artwork first: If your thinking of re-decorating and you know you’re after a statement piece of art, don’t start your interiors palette with a cushion.  Use your artwork as the initial source for your palette. That doesn’t mean that you buy a blue artwork and then buy everything in blue.  It might be something as simple as buying most of your furnishings in a neutral tones and then pulling pops of colours from your artwork to tie the work into the room.

Invest in framing: Great framing makes all the difference in showcasing your piece of art – even an original Kathryn Del Barton or David Bromley will look cheap in a terrible frame.  Most artworks will look their best in deep set frames made in Black, White, American Oak or stained Walnut tones.

 
sophie bray
“Shifting Rain” and “Dark Horizons” by Sophie Bray
 

Think about scale: A small artwork on a large wall can be a disaster. Think about the space where you will hang your artwork and let it guide you to buy the right work for the right space. If you fall in love with a small work which you intend to hang on a large wall, think about buying complimentary works to hang together and begin a picture wall.

Invest: “Good art is never cheap, and cheap art is never good”. Think of collectable art as a good investment, you may need to reach a little deeper into your pockets but you will get ultimate joy from your piece and in most cases it will accrue in value.  That’s not to say there isn’t room for wonderful more cost effective pieces of art in the home, but when investing in a statement piece, think longer term as an investment.

       
cat
Continue shopping
Your Order

You have no items in your cart